Archives 2001-2008

By , August 22, 2009 8:32 pm

I began life as an online film critic back in 2001, when James Owen and I created Filmsnobs.com.  We had no idea what we were doing (animated .gif files!) and never thought anyone outside our immediate family would ever see it. Seven years and hundreds of reviews later, we were named one of Kansas City’s Best 30 Artists Under 30 by the Kansas City Star, became members of the Kansas City Film Critics Circle, and stand alongside the Eberts and Denbys of the world at Rotten Tomatoes. At its peak, Filmsnobs had over 400,000 unique visitors a month and was one of the premier online film critic websites. I went on to contribute to the esteemed Flak Magazine and Cinemarati: The Alliance for Film Criticism. Small victories included plaudits from big time journalists like Christopher Hitchens regarding his review of Farhenheit 911, and a complimentary email from Louie C.K. (I was the only critic who understood his vision for Pootie Tang!)  And we fought with and got smeared by the gossip columnist for the Star (thanks for upping the hit count, Hearne!). Overall, Filmsnobs had quite a run.  But as happens on the web, hobbies intrude into real life and content becomes a burden. That, and the old Filmsnobs site was running on stone age html and content management systems, so it was time to start over.  James graduated to a real actual paying job as the film critic at KY-3 in Springfield, MO, where he keeps the “Front Row at 5” movie blog and does a segment every Thursday at 5:25.  Movie Day at the Court is my re-entry into the world of criticism, blending my love of movies, the Supreme Court, and Kansas City into one blog.  I’m not sure if it will work either.  But if not, there’s always the glory days.  Archives from Filmsnobs and other sources below.

Filmsnobs.com

Filmsnobs Movie Review Archives

Steve’s Articles only at Filmsnobs

Steve’s Articles for Flak Magazine

Steve’s Contributions to Cinemarati 

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